Effect Of Methylphenidate On Balance In Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Overview

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder that may have poor motor coordination and balance control. The effect of Methylphenidate treatment on balance and fall risk is still unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on balance, fall risk, and sensorimotor integration in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

Full Title of Study: “Effect Of Methylphenidate On Static Balance And Fall Risk In Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Cross-Sectional Study”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Observational
  • Study Design
    • Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
  • Study Primary Completion Date: January 2017

Detailed Description

Children who were diagnosed with ADHD for the first time were classified in the ADHD group (n=33), children with ADHD who were treated with MPH for a minimum of 3 months were classified in the treatment group (n=32), and typically developing children were classified in the third-the control group (n=20) in this observational cross-sectional study. Fall risk, static postural balance and sensorimotor integration were assessed using the Biodex Balance System.Postural stability tests, including overall stability index (OSI), anterior-posterior stability index (APSI), and medial-lateral stability index (MLSI), were used to evaluate postural control. The Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction in Balance (m-CTSIB) testing protocol was used to evaluate sensory integration capabilities and balance. Fall risk was evaluated by biodex balance system.

Interventions

  • Device: Fall risk
    • Fall risk, static postural balance and sensorimotor integration were assessed using the Biodex Balance System.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • ADHD group
    • Children who were diagnosed with ADHD for the first time were classified in the ADHD group (n=33)
  • treatment group
    • children with ADHD who were treated with MPH for a minimum of 3 months were classified in the treatment group (n=32)
  • control group
    • typically developing children were classified in the third-the control group (n=20)

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • postural control
    • Time Frame: one year
    • Postural stability tests, including overall stability index (OSI), anterior-posterior stability index (APSI), and medial-lateral stability index (MLSI)
  • sensorimotor integration
    • Time Frame: one year
    • The Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction in Balance (m-CTSIB) testing protocol was used to evaluate sensory integration capabilities and balance. Four different conditions were evaluated for the m-CTSIB test protocol: Eyes Open Firm Surface (EOFS), Eyes Closed Firm Surface (ECFS), Eyes Open Soft Surface (EOSS), and Eyes Closed Soft Surface (ECSS)
  • Fall risk
    • Time Frame: one year
    • Fall risk evaluation by biodex balance system

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

-children who were diagnosed with ADHD for the first time according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V, American Psychiatric Association, 2013) Exclusion Criteria:

  • neurological disorders – psychiatric disorders – musculoskeletal disorders – cardiopulmonary diseases – visual impairments – developmental coordination disorders that could affect balance

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 8 Years

Maximum Age: 12 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Sponsor

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