Digital Media Usage With Impulsivity and Attention Deficit in Children

Overview

To explore the relationship between children's digital media usage and attention, activity, parenting pressure; to explore the relationship between family basic data factors and screen usage.

Full Title of Study: “The Relationship Between the Digital Media Usage With Impulsivity and Attention Deficit in Children With Early Intervention”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Observational
  • Study Design
    • Time Perspective: Retrospective
  • Study Primary Completion Date: December 31, 2022

Detailed Description

Background: Digital products are inseparable from life. Parents may feel that teaching materials are educational because of their high availability.Meaning, busy work, helping to share care or short respite, etc., and providing digital products for children, it is very important to understand children's behavior, usage habits, and the relationship between parents.According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, parents should limit their exposure to most types of screen time until the child is 2 years old , and children 2-5 years old should be less than one hour per day, and it is recommended to watch high Quality program content, accompanied by adults. The standards for screen time in various countries generally follow this policy.However, many studies have found that most children spend far more screen time than recommended guidelines. Research in Canada and the United States indicates that children aged three to five spend more than two hours a day on average. According to a tracking study, children aged three to five were surveyed on their In terms of screen use, it was found that compared with children who watched less than half an hour, children who used more than two hours a day had more significant implicit and explicit behavioral problems, namely withdrawal, nervousness, anxiety, irritability and attention deficit, and restless behavior. Objective: To explore the relationship between children's digital media usage and attention, activity, parenting pressure; to explore the relationship between family basic data factors and screen usage. Methods: Individual caregivers were interviewed through paper or electronic questionnaires to assess children's and families' digital media usage habits, children's activity levels, and parental stress. The following assessment tools were used. Including digital media use survey at home (refer to Surveillance of digital-Media habits in earLy childhood Questionnaire, SMALLQ™), Chinese version of parental child activity scale (Werry-Weiss Peters Activity Scale Chinese version, WWPAS), parental stress scale brief Form (Parenting Stress Index: Short form, PSI/SF)

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Caregivers whose children are currently receiving early treatment
    • Individual caregivers were interviewed through paper questionnaires to assess children’s and families’ digital media usage habits, children’s activity levels, and parental stress. Pearson’s Chi-Square test and liner regression was used for analysis.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Surveillance of digital-Media habits in earLy childhood Questionnaire, SMALLQ™
    • Time Frame: Baseline at first evaluate time
    • An survey used to estimate the weekday & weekend parent-reported on-screen & off-screen media habits of preschoolers, among other things. The information including three segments: (i) digital media use, parent concern, knowledge and practice of guidelines, outside of school on weekday and weekend; (ii) non-digital media habits: indoor and outdoor play, day time naps, non-screen reading, and drawing; (iii) parent educational attainment and household income, additional child information: height, weight, wearing spectacles or not, and night-time sleep.

Secondary Measures

  • Werry-Weiss Peters Activity Scale Chinese version, WWPAS
    • Time Frame: Baseline at first evaluate time
    • It is a 27 items inventory completed by parents, aimed at evaluating the child’s activity level in a family context, in various situations of daily life (e.g., during meals, watching television, while playing, in activities abroad). The total result is obtained by adding directly the scores of all the items and represents a general measure of the child’s activity level. Parents rated the frequency of their child’s behaviors as occurring “none,” “some,” or “much of the time” . However, interparent interrater reliability was reported to be good (Barkley, 1988). No information regarding the test-retest reliability or internal consistency was located (Barkley, 1988).
  • Parental stress scale brief Form
    • Time Frame: Baseline at first evaluate time
    • The scale assessing parents’ feelings about their parenting role, exploring both positive aspects (e.g. emotional benefits, personal development) and negative aspects of parenthood (e.g. demands on resources, feelings of stress). It contains various measures of stress, emotion and role satisfaction, including perceived stress, work/family stress, loneliness, anxiety, guilt, marital satisfaction/commitment, job satisfaction, and social support. The PSI has 36 items with a 5-point Likert scale, with response options ranging from “strongly agree” to “strongly disagree.” Responses on the measure are summed to create a total stress (TS) composite, which provides an indication of the amount of stress adults are experiencing due to their role as a parent (Abidin 1995). Internal consistency reliability was high for TS (α = .90).

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • Caregivers whose children are currently receiving early treatment and who can cooperate with the questionnaire; – The child's family has the habit of using digital media devices; – The child's main complaints include inattention and impulsivity; – The child's age is 3 to 6 years old. Exclusion Criteria:

  • The child has other specific diagnosed diseases, such as autism group, sensory disorder, known genetic and genetic diseases, etc.

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 20 Years

Maximum Age: 75 Years

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Taipei Medical University Shuang Ho Hospital
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Hsinchieh Lee, Taipei Medical University Shuang Ho Hospital – Taipei Medical University Shuang Ho Hospital
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Hsinchieh Lee, master, Principal Investigator, Taipei Medical University Shuang Ho Hospital
  • Overall Contact(s)
    • Hsinchieh Lee, master, +88622490088, 09549@s.tmu.edu.tw

References

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Werry-Weiss-Peters Activity Scale, W. W. P. Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioral Intervention.

Abidin, R. R. (1995). Parenting Stress Index (PSI) manual . Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.

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