Head Positions for Endotracheal Intubation Using a Videolaryngoscope

Overview

In this study, the investigators evaluate the effect of head positions (simple extension vs. sniffing position vs. head lift position) on endotracheal intubation using a videolaryngoscope.

Full Title of Study: “Impact of Head Positions on Endotracheal Intubation Using a Videolaryngoscope”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Other
    • Masking: Double (Participant, Outcomes Assessor)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: December 30, 2022

Interventions

  • Procedure: endotracheal intubation
    • Endotracheal intubation is performed in simple head extension or sniffing position using a McGrath MAC videolaryngoscope with a blade for normal or difficult airways

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: Simple extension
    • After induction of anesthesia, endotracheal intubation was performed in simple extension without a pillow using a McGrath MAC videolaryngoscope.
  • Experimental: Head lift
    • After induction of anesthesia, endotracheal intubation was performed in a head lift position with a pillow using a McGrath MAC videolaryngoscope.
  • Experimental: Sniffing position
    • After induction of anesthesia, endotracheal intubation was performed in a sniffing position using a McGrath MAC videolaryngoscope.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Intubation time
    • Time Frame: Procedure (During endotracheal intubation)
    • The time taken for endotracheal intubation is recorded.

Secondary Measures

  • Percentage of glottic opening (POGO) score
    • Time Frame: Procedure (During endotracheal intubation)
    • POGO score is recorded during endotracheal intubation (0%: no visualization of glottic opening; 100%: entire visualization of the glottic opening).
  • Number of attempts
    • Time Frame: Procedure (At the end of endotracheal intubation)
    • Number of attempts for endotracheal intubation is recorded.
  • Ease of intubation
    • Time Frame: Procedure (During endotracheal intubation)
    • Ease of endotracheal intubation is assessed using the intubation difficulty scale. Intubation difficulty scale includes number of attempts, number of operators, number of alternative techniques, Cormack-Lehane grades and so on.
  • Pharyngeal wall injury
    • Time Frame: Procedure (During endotracheal intubation)
    • Presence of pharyngeal wall injury is observed.
  • Lifting force for advancing an endotracheal tube into the larynx
    • Time Frame: Procedure (During endotracheal intubation)
    • Requirement for lifting force is recorded during the advancement of the endotracheal tube into the larynx.
  • Laryngeal pressure for advancing an endotracheal tube into the larynx.
    • Time Frame: Procedure (During endotracheal intubation)
    • Requirement for laryngeal pressure is recorded during the advancement of the endotracheal tube into the larynx.

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • Patients scheduled for general anesthesia Exclusion Criteria:

  • Limited neck extension – Anatomical anomalies or history of surgery in the upper airway – Weak teeth – Risk of pulmonary aspiration

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 19 Years

Maximum Age: N/A

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: No

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Jin-Young Hwang, Professor – SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Jin-Young Hwang, PhD., Principal Investigator, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center
  • Overall Contact(s)
    • Jin-Young Hwang, PhD, 82-2-870-2851, mms@naver.com

Clinical trials entries are delivered from the US National Institutes of Health and are not reviewed separately by this site. Please see the identifier information above for retrieving further details from the government database.

At TrialBulletin.com, we keep tabs on over 200,000 clinical trials in the US and abroad, using medical data supplied directly by the US National Institutes of Health. Please see the About and Contact page for details.