Neurodynamic Sliding Verses Static Stretching

Overview

Hamstring muscle are more likely to shorten among all biarticular muscles of human body. One of the many factors of hamstring tightness is increased tension in the neural structure. Apart from routine stretching techniques, mobilization of nervous system proves to be more effective. There are lot of stretching techniques available but they are more effective after multiple sessions. This study aims to cater the problem of hamstring tightness by neural sliding and static stretching in minimum sessions and compare which technique is more effective in resolving the issue.

Full Title of Study: “Comparison Of Neurodynamic Sliding Verses Static Stretching On Clinical Outcomes In People With Hamstring Tightness: A Randomized Control Trail”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Other
    • Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: May 27, 2021

Detailed Description

Randomized Controlled Trials was used to collect data. Total patients were selected in two group with each 31 subjects. Purposive sampling technique was used. Experimental group will receive routine physical therapy along with TENS, Hot pack and Neurodynamic Stretching. (For 30 seconds, 3 times per session for 3 alternative days a week & duration of 4 weeks). Outcome measure will be the hamstring tightness value angle in degrees, which will be obtained with the help of goniometer after performing active knee extension test and active straight leg raise test

Interventions

  • Other: Neurodynamic Sliding
    • Participants supine with their cervical and thoracic spine supported in a forward flexed position. Simultaneous hip and knee flexion will be alternated dynamically with simultaneous hip and knee extension. The therapist will change the arrangement of movement depending on the tissue resistance level.
  • Other: Static Stretching
    • Participent lying supine, the therapist will passively position the subject into the straight leg raise position without discomfort or pain to the point where resistance to movement will be first felt.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: Neurodynamic Sliding
    • participents receive routine physical therapy along with TENS, Hot pack and Neurodynamic Stretching. (For 30 seconds, 3 times per session for 3 alternative days a week & duration of 4 weeks).
  • Active Comparator: Static Streching
    • Participent receive the routine physical therapy treatment that will include TENS, Hot pack and static stretching for 30 seconds and 3 times per session for 3 alternative days a week (duration of 4 weeks).

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Change from Baseline in Hamstring flexibility assessed with Active Knee Extension Test
    • Time Frame: Baseline, 2nd Week, 4th week
    • This test is use to measure Hamstring tightness. 0 degree indicates more hamstring flexibility
  • Change from Baseline in Hamstring flexibility assessed with Straight Leg raise
    • Time Frame: Baseline, 2nd Week, 4th week
    • This test is use to measure hamstring tightness. 90 degree indicates more hamstring flexibility

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • People with age ranging between 25 and 35 years. – Hamstring tightness of twenty degrees – Incapability to reach seventy degree hip flexion in SLR. Exclusion Criteria:

  • Neurological or orthopedic diseases – Chronic or acute low back pain, Hamstring injury. – During last three month, involved in any lower extremity exercise programs.

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 25 Years

Maximum Age: 40 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • University of Lahore
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Sponsor
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Mohsin Majeed, Principal Investigator, University of Lahore
    • Fahad Tanveer, Study Chair, University of Lahore

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