Prospective RELOC-AGE: How Do Housing Choices and Relocation Matter for Active Ageing?

Overview

The objective of prospective RELOC-AGE is to study housing choices and relocation and to examine the effects on active ageing among people aged 55+ considering relocation. All data collection will be conducted at baseline and after 12 and 24 months of follow-up.

Study Type

  • Study Type: Observational
  • Study Design
    • Time Perspective: Prospective
  • Study Primary Completion Date: September 30, 2023

Detailed Description

The objective of prospective RELOC-AGE is to study housing choices and relocation and to examine the effects on active ageing among people aged 55+ considering relocation. Research Questions 1. What aspects of housing, health and participation predict a) relocation to different housing options in the ordinary housing stock; b) residential care facilities; c) remaining in the present dwelling? 2. How is the complex interaction between objective and perceived aspects of housing, health and participation associated with active ageing, and what are the patterns and characteristics of such dynamics? 3. What housing attributes do people aged 55+ considering relocation find important, and to what extent, when making their decisions on housing preferences? 4. How do people aged 55+ considering relocation reason a) regarding different housing options; b) motives for considering and effectuating relocation, and; c) to what extent are their motives fulfilled? The sample will include people aged 55+ considering relocation. Recruitment will be made from a sub-sample based on waiting lists (n=22 000) among two housing companies in Sweden: Karlshamnsbostäder AB and Riksbyggen. The expected final sample size is n=3000. Quantitative data will be collected through two web surveys and one telephone interview at baseline, 12 and 24 months. Data on primary and secondary outcomes are based on established questionnaires used in previous research on older people, health, and housing as well as in national public health surveys in Sweden. In addition to primary and secondary outcomes (presented below), the surveys include demographic and socioeconomic characteristics including civil status, education level, economic situation, occupational status, holding a driver license, critical life events (e.g., death of spouse, long-term disease, divorce), original nationality; questions about present housing situation (dwelling characteristics (e.g., type and size of dwelling, location) and neighborhood characteristics (e.g., access to services and green areas), potential and realized mobility, social/cohabiting situation, time spent at home, housing adaptations); use of technical aids for mobility, use of health, social and informal care, thoughts about future housing, reasons related to consideration about relocating and moving intentions. Data on stated preferences in relation to housing will be collected in a specific survey based on a discrete choice methodology. Qualitative interviews will be conducted consecutively with a subsample (n=100) of respondents who have relocated during the follow-up period. Further, linking to register data will be made within the scope of Register RELOC-AGE, which is another part of the larger project. For quantitative data, descriptive, exploratory, and inferential statistics will be used. For longitudinal analyses, generalised linear models or Cox regression with time-dependent covariates will be applied. Throughout, we will control for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and other potential confounders and compare the results across different cohorts. Quantitative analyses will be conducted using standard statistical software. For analyses of DCE data, we will use the conditional logit model (also referred to as the multinomial logit model) as the reference model, but the analysis will be extended to mixed logit and latent class models to take preference heterogeneity into account. Qualitative interviews will be audio-recorded and transc¬ribed verbatim and principles from Grounded Theory will be used for the analysis.

Interventions

  • Other: No intervention is administered
    • No intervention is administered, the cohort is followed in order to evaluate the impact of housing and relocation on active ageing outcomes.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Persons 55 years or older considering relocation
    • No intervention is administered.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • University of Jyväskylä Active Aging Scale (UJACAS)
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Active Ageing score to 12 months
    • 17 items(areas of activity), each to be self-rated regarding goals, ability, autonomy and activity (total scores 0-272)
  • University of Jyväskylä Active Aging Scale (UJACAS)
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Active Ageing score to 24 months
    • 17 items(areas of activity), each to be self-rated regarding goals, ability, autonomy and activity (total scores 0-272)

Secondary Measures

  • Life-space mobility
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Life-space mobility to 12 months
    • 6 items related to life spaces visited during the past four weeks, whether the person had visited (yes/no), frequency on a four-point scale, and level of dependence on others or technical equipment on a three-point scale)
  • Life-space mobility
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Life-space mobility to 24 months
    • 6 items related to life spaces visited during the past four weeks, whether the person had visited (yes/no), frequency on a four-point scale, and level of dependence on others or technical equipment on a three-point scale)
  • Meaning of home
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Meaning of home scores to 12 months
    • 28 items with statements to which respondents state agreement on a ten-point scale from 1 (not at all) to 10 (very much)
  • Meaning of home
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Meaning of home scores to 24 months
    • 28 items with statements to which respondents state agreement on a ten-point scale from 1 (not at all) to 10 (very much)
  • Housing related control beliefs
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Housing related control beliefs scores to 12 months
    • 24 items with statements to which respondents state agreement on a five-point scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (very much)
  • Housing related control beliefs
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Housing related control beliefs scores to 24 months
    • 24 items with statements to which respondents state agreement on a five-point scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (very much)
  • Usability in my home
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Usability in my home scores to 12 months
    • 4 items (selected from original instrument) with statements about aspects of usability rated on a five-point scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (very much)
  • Usability in my home
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Usability in my home scores to 24 months
    • 4 items (selected from original instrument) with statements about aspects of usability rated on a five-point scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (very much)
  • Housing satisfaction
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Housing satisfaction scores to 12 months
    • One item “Are you happy with the condition of your home?” answered on a five-point scale from 1 (definitely not) to 5 (‘yes, definitely)
  • Housing satisfaction
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Housing satisfaction scores to 24 months
    • One item “Are you happy with the condition of your home?” answered on a five-point scale from 1 (definitely not) to 5 (‘yes, definitely)
  • Health-related Quality of life
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Health-related Quality of Life to 12 months
    • EuroQol-5d questionnaire (5 items, range 1-5 per item, with higher score indicating worse outcome)
  • Health-related Quality of life
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Health-related Quality of Life to 24 months
    • EuroQol-5d questionnaire (5 items, range 1-5 per item, with higher score indicating worse outcome)
  • Self-rated health
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Self-rated Health to 12 months
    • One item “How would you rate your own health”, rated from 1 (bad) to 5 (excellent)
  • Self-rated health
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Self-rated Health to 24 months
    • One item “How would you rate your own health”, rated from 1 (bad) to 5 (excellent)
  • Life satisfaction
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Life satisfaction to 12 months
    • One item “How satisfied are you with life in general”, rated from 1 (very unsatisfied) to 6 (very satisfied)
  • Life satisfaction
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Life satisfaction to 24 months
    • One item “How satisfied are you with life in general”, rated from 1 (very unsatisfied) to 6 (very satisfied)
  • Housing enabler, functional limitations
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Functional limitations to 12 months
    • 8 items indicating presence (yes or yes to some extent) /absence (no) functional limitations
  • Housing enabler, functional limitations
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Functional limitations to 24 months
    • 8 items indicating presence (yes or yes to some extent) /absence (no) functional limitations
  • General self-efficacy
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Genreal Self-efficacy to 12 months
    • 10 items with statements to which respondents state agreement on a four-point scale from 1 (completely disagree) to 4 (totally agree)
  • General self-efficacy
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Genreal Self-efficacy to 24 months
    • 10 items with statements to which respondents state agreement on a four-point scale from 1 (completely disagree) to 4 (totally agree)
  • Physical exercise
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline physical exercise duration/week to 12 months
    • Rated as duration per week on five levels from 0 minutes to 2 hours or more
  • Physical exercise
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline physical exercise duration/week to 24 months
    • Rated as duration per week on five levels from 0 minutes to 2 hours or more
  • Physical activity
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline physical activity duration/week to 12 months
    • Rated as duration per week on six levels from 0 minutes to 2 hours or more
  • Physical activity
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline physical activity duration/week to 24 months
    • Rated as duration per week on six levels from 0 minutes to 2 hours or more
  • Frailty (FRESCH)
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Frailty scores to 12 months
    • 4 items to be answered yes or no
  • Frailty (FRESCH)
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Frailty scores to 24 months
    • 4 items to be answered yes or no
  • Satisfaction with mobility opportunities
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Satisfaction with mobility opportunities to 12 months
    • One item, rated from 1 (very satisfied) to 5 (very unsatisfied)
  • Satisfaction with mobility opportunities
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline Satisfaction with mobility opportunities to 24 months
    • One item, rated from 1 (very satisfied) to 5 (very unsatisfied)

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • Persons 55 years or older, living in Sweden, listed for relocation at any of the two housing companies Karlshamnsbostäder (a public housing company) and Riksbyggen (a condominium provider) Exclusion Criteria:

  • Severe cognitive impairments or insufficient language skills to give informed consent and participate in telephone interviews

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 55 Years

Maximum Age: N/A

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Lund University
  • Collaborator
    • Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (Forte)
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Susanne Iwarsson, Professor – Lund University
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Inger Kristensson Hallstrom, PhD, Study Chair, Lunds University
  • Overall Contact(s)
    • Susanne Iwarsson, PhD, +46-46-2221940, susanne.iwarsson@med.lu.se

Clinical trials entries are delivered from the US National Institutes of Health and are not reviewed separately by this site. Please see the identifier information above for retrieving further details from the government database.

At TrialBulletin.com, we keep tabs on over 200,000 clinical trials in the US and abroad, using medical data supplied directly by the US National Institutes of Health. Please see the About and Contact page for details.