The Dual Factor Model of Mental Health in Inpatients

Overview

The Dual Factor Model of mental health (DFM; Greensporn & Saklofske, 2001) postulates that mental health consists of two at least partially unrelated factors, the experience or absence of psycho-pathological symptoms (i.e. depressive symptoms) and the experience or absence of positive mental health (i.e. life satisfaction, meaningfulness). Both factors contribute to an individual's well-being and mental health.The DFM has been used as a framework to describe and evaluate participants' mental health in different settings in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs mostly outside of clinical settings. Psychological Interventions, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy are widely studied concerning their reduction of psycho-pathological symptoms. However, little is known about the effect of psychological interventions on the second factor (positive mental health) of the DFM. This is especially important, because the latter has been shown to contribute significantly to subjective well-being and to reduce the risk of suicidal intentions and behavior.

Primary, the authors aim to investigate the DFM in an inpatient sample over the course of time (pre-treatment, post-treatment, 6 and 12 months after discharge). Secondly, they aim to investigate the relationship between positive mental health and suicidal ideation over the course of time.

Full Title of Study: “The Dual Factor Model of Mental Health: A Longitudinal Study in Inpatients”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Observational
  • Study Design
    • Time Perspective: Prospective
  • Study Primary Completion Date: January 2022

Detailed Description

Participants will be divided into four groups according to the DFM over the course of time:

1. unhappy: high psychopathology and low positive mental health; depression and/or anxiety scores above published cut -offs and positive mental health scores under published cut offs.

2. symptomatic but content: high psychopathology and high positive mental health; depression and/or anxiety scores above published cut -offs and normal to high positive mental health scores

3. vulnerable: low psychopathology and low positive mental health; depression and/or anxiety scores under published cut -offs and positive mental health scores under published cut offs

4. Complete mental health: low psychopathology and high positive mental health; depression and/or anxiety scores under published cut -offs normal to high positive mental health scores.

The authors will then depict the movements of patients through these groups graphically and use regression analyses to check for differences according to age, diagnosis and gender.

Towards the second aim they will use regression analyses to investigate the protective effect of positive mental health on suicidal ideation or behavior.

Interventions

  • Behavioral: Routine care inpatient treatment
    • All participants are receiving inpatient treatment consisting of a variety of psychological interventions such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, third-wave interventions, psycho-education and in some cases medication.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Study Group
    • All participants are inpatients at the clinic “Stillachhaus” in Germany. They are receiving treatment for a variety of psychological disoders, mostly depressive disoders.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21; Nilges et al., 2016)
    • Time Frame: In the first 3 days of treatment
    • Measures depression, anxiety and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe anxiety, depression and stress. Measures anxiety, depression and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe symptoms.
  • Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21; Nilges et al., 2016)
    • Time Frame: In the last three days of treatment
    • Measures depression, anxiety and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe anxiety, depression and stress. Measures depression, anxiety and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe anxiety, depression and stress. Measures depression, anxiety and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe anxiety, depression and stress. Measures anxiety, depression and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe symptoms.
  • Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21; Nilges et al., 2016)
    • Time Frame: 6 months after discharge
    • Measures depression, anxiety and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe anxiety, depression and stress. Measures anxiety, depression and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe symptoms.
  • Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21; Nilges et al., 2016)
    • Time Frame: 12 months after discharge
    • Measures depression, anxiety and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe anxiety, depression and stress. Measures anxiety, depression and stress with 21 items. Scores range from 0-63 with higher scores indicating more severe symptoms.
  • Positive mental health scale (PMH; Lukat et al., 2016)
    • Time Frame: In the first 3 days of treatment
    • Measures positive psychological functioning with 9 items. Scores range from 0-27 with higher scores indicating more positive mental health.
  • Positive mental health scale (PMH; Lukat et al., 2016)
    • Time Frame: In the last three days of treatment
    • Measures positive psychological functioning with 9 items. Scores range from 0-27 with higher scores indicating more positive mental health
  • Positive mental health scale (PMH; Lukat et al., 2016)
    • Time Frame: 6 months discharge
    • Measures positive psychological functioning with 9 items. Scores range from 0-27 with higher scores indicating more positive mental health
  • Positive mental health scale (PMH; Lukat et al., 2016)
    • Time Frame: 12 months discharge
    • Measures positive psychological functioning with 9 items. Scores range from 0-27 with higher scores indicating more positive mental health.

Secondary Measures

  • Suicidal Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ; Osman et al., 2001) ).
    • Time Frame: In the first 3 days of treatment
    • Assesses past and current suicidal ideation and behavior. Scores range from 3-18 with higher scores indicating a higher risk for suicidal behavior.
  • Suicidal Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ; Osman et al., 2001) ).
    • Time Frame: In the last three days of treatment
    • Assesses past and current suicidal ideation and behavior. Scores range from 3-18 with higher scores indicating a higher risk for suicidal behavior.
  • Suicidal Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ; Osman et al., 2001) ).
    • Time Frame: 6 months after discharge
    • Assesses past and current suicidal ideation and behavior. Scores range from 3-18 with higher scores indicating a higher risk for suicidal behavior.
  • Suicidal Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ; Osman et al., 2001) ).
    • Time Frame: 12 months after discharge
    • Assesses past and current suicidal ideation and behavior. Scores range from 3-18 with higher scores indicating a higher risk for suicidal behavior.

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

-inpatients at the Stiilachaus Privatklinik

Exclusion Criteria

-None

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 18 Years

Maximum Age: N/A

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: No

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Ruhr University of Bochum
  • Collaborator
    • Stillachhaus Privatklinik
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Ruth von Brachel, Principal Investigator – Ruhr University of Bochum
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Juergen Margraf, Prof., Study Director, Ruhr-University Bochum

Clinical trials entries are delivered from the US National Institutes of Health and are not reviewed separately by this site. Please see the identifier information above for retrieving further details from the government database.

At TrialBulletin.com, we keep tabs on over 200,000 clinical trials in the US and abroad, using medical data supplied directly by the US National Institutes of Health. Please see the About and Contact page for details.