The Effect of Intraoperative Body Temperature on Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Pediatric Patients

Overview

The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of changes in body temperature in the perioperative period on postoperative nausea and vomiting.

Study Type

  • Study Type: Observational [Patient Registry]
  • Study Design
    • Time Perspective: Prospective
  • Study Primary Completion Date: February 7, 2020

Detailed Description

Undesirable hypothermia is that the perioperative body temperature is below 36 ° C. Perioperative heat loss is higher in pediatric patients than in adult patients. One of the most common side effects of general anesthesia is nausea and vomiting. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of changes in body temperature in the perioperative period on postoperative nausea and vomiting.We planned to perform prospectively in 80 children with ASA I according to the American Society of Anesthesia (ASA) Anesthesia Risk Scale between 6 months and 7 years of age in both sexes who underwent inguinal hernia, undescended testes and hydrocele surgery. In all patients, heating blanket was placed on the operation table and standard heat was used. After the placement of the LMA, a nasopharyngeal heat probe was placed for central body temperature measurement and monitored throughout the operation. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and body temperature were recorded. Demographic data, type of operation, duration of operation and intraoperative fentanyl requirement of all cases were recorded. Analgesic and antiemetic requirements, presence of nausea and vomiting (according to numerical sequence scale) were recorded in the recovery room at 6, 12 and 24 hours postoperatively

Interventions

  • Other: body temperature measurement
    • Postoperative analgesic and antiemetic requirements, nausea and vomiting were observed in the recovery room at 6, 12 and 24 hours

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • body temperature measurement
    • The investigators planned to perform prospectively in 80 children with ASA I according to the American Society of Anesthesia (ASA) Anesthesia Risk Scale between 6 months and 7 years of age in both sexes who underwent inguinal hernia, undescended testes and hydrocele surgery

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • hypothermia
    • Time Frame: intraoperative
    • Perioperative body temperature below 36 ° C is defined as unwanted hypothermia. It may cause postoperative neusea and vomiting.
  • Postoperative Nausea and vomiting
    • Time Frame: Postoperative 24 hours
    • Postoperative analgesic and antiemetic requirements, nausea and vomiting were observed in the recovery room at 6, 12 and 24 hours.The investigators use numerical scale for posteoprative nausea and vomiting. 0-no nausea and vomiting, 1-nausea yes, vomiting no, 2- only 1 episode of vomiting and score3 is multiple vomiting episodes. if score is 1 or more than 1 we apllied antiemetics.

Secondary Measures

  • Postoperative Pain
    • Time Frame: Postoperative 24 Hours
    • Postoperative analgesic and antiemetic requirements, nausea and vomiting were observed in the recovery room at 6, 12 and 24 hours. The investigators use pediatric objective pain scale.

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • ASA1 group
  • Aged 6 months to 7 years
  • lower abdominal and urological surgery

Exclusion Criteria

  • Upper abdominal surgery
  • ASA 2-3 group
  • postoperative nausea and vomiting history

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 6 Months

Maximum Age: 7 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Bezmialem Vakif University
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: İsmail SÜMER, MD, Principal Investigator – Bezmialem Vakif University
  • Overall Official(s)
    • İsmail Sümer, MD, Principal Investigator, Bezmialem Vakif University

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