Breathalyzer Validation Study

Overview

The proposed project will test three commercial cellphone breathalyzers against a police grade breathalyzer device.The study will test the accuracy of these smartphone breathalyzers at assessing Breath Alcohol Content (BrAC) against a standard police grade breathalyzer. This study aims to fill the knowledge gap by determining the validity of smartphone paired breathalyzer devices to accurately assess BrAC. Data collection includes collection of BrAC measurements, as well as survey data.

Full Title of Study: “Reducing Risky Drinking Using Smartphone Paired Breathalyzer”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
    • Masking: None (Open Label)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: April 17, 2017

Interventions

  • Device: Smartphone-paired mobile breathalyzer
    • All subjects will first be given a priming dose of alcohol containing vodka designed to raise the blood alcohol content based on weight and gender. Blood alcohol content will first be measured with three commercial smartphone-paired breathalyzers: Drivesafe Evoc, Alcohoot, and BacTrack Pro which will be tested in a randomized order and recorded. Participants’ blood alcohol content will also be measured using the Intoxilyzer 240, a police grade breathalyzer device. After the tertiary dose of alcohol, a nurse will perform a blood draw on the participants, which will be used to determine blood alcohol content.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: Commercial Smartphone-paired breathalyzers
    • All subjects will first be given a priming dose of alcohol containing vodka designed to raise the blood alcohol content based on weight and gender. Blood alcohol content will first be measured with three commercial smartphone-paired breathalyzers: Drivesafe Evoc, Alcohoot, and BacTrack Pro which will be tested in a randomized order and recorded. Participants blood alcohol content will also be measured using the Intoxilyzer 240, a police grade breathalyzer device After the tertiary dose of alcohol, a nurse will perform a blood draw on the participants, which will be used to determine blood alcohol content.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Blood Alcohol Content Variability
    • Time Frame: 8 Hours
    • Mean paired-difference between the peak BrAC and phlebotomy drawn BAC among the police-grade and personal breath testing devices

Secondary Measures

  • Differences in Breathlyzer Readings
    • Time Frame: 8 Hours
    • Mean difference in BrAC between the police-grade and personal breath testing devices

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • Age 21-39 old
  • Less than 4 drinking days and less than 12 drinks per week on average in the past 2 months
  • Have previously consumed four (women) or five (men) or more standard drinks without problems
  • A valid photo ID
  • Willing to take public transportation home, via septa or an uber rideshare credit.

Exclusion Criteria

  • Desire alcohol treatment now or received it in the past 6 months
  • Alcohol dependence with withdrawal per DSM-V criteria
  • Non-English-speaking
  • Individuals who have a medical condition or who are taking medication which limits or prevents the consumption of alcohol.

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 21 Years

Maximum Age: 39 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • University of Pennsylvania
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Sponsor
  • Overall Official(s)
    • M. Kit Delgado, MD, MS, Principal Investigator, University of Pennsylvania

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