Risk Communication in African American Smokers

Overview

The study aims to understand the effects of learning about one's genetic risk for lung cancer that is specific to their ancestry. Participants will be given hypothetical personalized genetic risk results and ask to think about how they might respond to such information if they actually received such results.

Full Title of Study: “Nicotine Dependence and Lung Cancer Genetics in African Americans”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Prevention
    • Masking: None (Open Label)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: August 30, 2021

Detailed Description

The study aims to understand the effects of learning about one's genetic risk for lung cancer that is specific to their ancestry. Smokers will be randomized to receive hypothetical information about their genetic status and consider how they think they would respond if such results were actually presented to them. They will be randomly assigned to receive one of four sets of hypothetical genetic results: 1) High risk of lung cancer and high genetic African ancestry, 2) High risk of lung cancer and low genetic African ancestry, 3) Low risk of lung cancer and high genetic African ancestry, or 4) Low risk of lung cancer and low genetic African ancestry. After being given this hypothetical information, participants will complete brief questionnaires assessing perceived risk of lung cancer, worry about cancer, psychological distress, and motivation to quit smoking.

Interventions

  • Behavioral: HRHA
    • participants will be asked to consider a hypothetical scenario in which genetic test results reveal that: 1) they carry genotypes that place African American smokers at a particularly high (~50%-80%) risk for the development of lung cancer, and 2) their genetic profile reflects a particularly high concordance with African heritage (~90%).
  • Behavioral: LRLA
    • participants will be asked to consider a scenario in which genetic test results reveal that: 1) they are at normal (~7%-10%) risk for the development of lung cancer, and 2) their genetic profile reflects a particularly low concordance with African heritage (~10%).
  • Behavioral: HRLA
    • participants will receive “High Risk, Low Ancestry (HRLA)” hypothetical
  • Behavioral: LRHA
    • participants will receive “Low Risk, High Ancestry (HRLA)” hypothetical

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: HRHA
    • High Risk, High Ancestry
  • Experimental: LRLA
    • Low Risk, Low Ancestry
  • Experimental: HRLA
    • High Risk, Low Ancestry
  • Experimental: LRHA
    • Low Risk, High Ancestry

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Motivation to Quit Smoking
    • Time Frame: immediately following intervention
    • use self report 7 item (condition options) MTSS (Motivation to Stop Smoking) Scale with yes/no option to determine the quitting intention condition

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • 18 years of age minimum
  • Self-report African American
  • Report smoking at least 100 lifetime cigarettes

Exclusion Criteria

  • Report history of cancer

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 18 Years

Maximum Age: N/A

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Temple University
  • Collaborator
    • National Cancer Institute (NCI)
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Sponsor
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Camille Ragin, PhD, Principal Investigator, Fox Chase Cancer Center
  • Overall Contact(s)
    • Grace X Ma, PhD, 215-707-6493, grace.ma@temple.edu

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