Effect of Multi-media Health Education on Nurses’ Workload and Patient’s Satisfaction

Overview

Assessing whether multi-media health education reduce nurse workload and does not decrease the satisfaction of patients in surgical ward when admission.

Full Title of Study: “If Muti-media Health Education Reduces the Workload of Nurses Without Affecting Patient’s Satisfaction:a Perspective Randomized Controlled Trial”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
    • Masking: Double (Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: July 1, 2020

Detailed Description

Operation usually causes severe physical and mental stress to the patients, mainly because of fear and anxiety caused by patients worrying about the uncertainty about surgery, and finally affecting the patient's surgical efficacy and recovery. This is the main reason in terms of surgical nurse workload is much more than those internal medicine nurse.

As a major part of nursing work, health education has especially important to patients. The quality and efficiency of health education directly affects the rehabilitation of patients. It can help patients correctly understand the relevant knowledge of disease and master the skills of recovery.

At present, the health education in surgery department is mainly carried out by oral face-to-face communication and guidance from admission nurses. This kind of education method showed time-consuming and laborious.In addition, oral guidance is more reliable on nurse ability of expression and acknowledgement. Multimedia-based health education is an update mode combined with audio-visual stimulation and patients' own participation. Mobile terminal makes patient more acceptable, flexible, standardized in receiving the health education during hospitalization. This prospective study is aimed to assess whether multimedia-video education could reduce nurse workload and do not decrease the satisfaction of surgical patients.

Interventions

  • Other: Multimedia video health education
    • The experimental group conducted multimedia video education while admission.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: Multimedia video education
    • The experimental group conducted multimedia video education while admission.
  • No Intervention: None multimedia video education
    • The control group conducted usual nursing of oral face-to-face education on admission.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Nursing workload
    • Time Frame: 1 month
    • Daily working hours for admission nurses on patients guidance on the first 24 hours in hospital, include the length of guidance time and the inquiry times.
  • The satisfaction of patients, family members, doctors and nurses about health education: Questionnaire
    • Time Frame: 1 month
    • The questionnaires were designed by ourselves according to relevant research and literature, to quantify the level of satisfaction on admission health education for patients and family members, and also doctors and nurses . The patients and family members satisfaction questionnaire has 11 satisfaction questions, which scored on a scale of 1-5(one to five stars, one star represents unsatisfactory, five stars represent highly satisfactory). The scores range from 11-55. 11-21 Unsatisfactory 22-32 Not quite satisfactory 33-43 Generally satisfactory 44-55 Highly satisfactory The doctors and nurses satisfaction questionnaire has 15 satisfaction questions, which scored on a scale of 1-5(one to five stars, one star represents unsatisfactory, five stars represent highly satisfactory). The scores range from 15-75. 15-29 Unsatisfactory 30-44 Not quite satisfactory 45-59 Generally satisfactory 60-75 Highly satisfactory

Secondary Measures

  • Patients’ anxiety level before and after health education: Zung Self Rating Anxiety Scale(SAS)
    • Time Frame: 1 month
    • The Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) is an anxiety measure designed by William WK Zung to quantify the level of anxiety for patients experiencing anxiety related symptoms. The self-administered test has 20 questions. Each question is scored on a scale of 1-4 (none or a little of the time, some of the time, good part of the time, most of the time). There are fifteen questions worded toward increasing anxiety levels and five questions worded toward decreasing anxiety levels. The scores range from 20-80. 20-44 Normal Range 45-59 Mild to Moderate Anxiety Levels 60-74 Marked to Severe Anxiety Levels 75-80 Extreme Anxiety Levels
  • Inquiry times on health education content of patients family members
    • Time Frame: 1 month
    • The exactly times of patient’s family members ask nursing staff for health education content.
  • The times of patients and their family members watched the health education videos
    • Time Frame: 1 month
    • The times of patients and their family members watched the health education videos.

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • Patients older than 18 years with general diseases and who need surgical treatment
  • Primary school or above education history, with clear awareness, can cooperate with the collection of clinical data, and can communicate in Chinese
  • Patients who signed the informed consent

Exclusion Criteria

  • Patients with visual and hearing impairment
  • Patients with mental illness, dementia and other mental disorders
  • Patients with complications of heart, brain and nephropathy
  • Patients who cannot take care of themselves
  • Emergency and critically ill patients
  • Patients participated other research

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 18 Years

Maximum Age: 75 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: No

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery Institute of Gansu Province
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Jia Yao, Ph.D Clinical research administration officer – Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery Institute of Gansu Province
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Jia Yao, Ph. D., Principal Investigator, Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery Institute of Gansu Province
  • Overall Contact(s)
    • Jia Yao, Ph. D., +8613893631130, yaoj06@lzu.edu.cn

Citations Reporting on Results

Jacob C, Sanchez-Vazquez A, Ivory C. Clinicians' Role in the Adoption of an Oncology Decision Support App in Europe and Its Implications for Organizational Practices: Qualitative Case Study. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. 2019 May 3;7(5):e13555. doi: 10.2196/13555.

Hindi AMK, Seston EM, Bell D, Steinke D, Willis S, Schafheutle EI. Independent prescribing in primary care: A survey of patients', prescribers' and colleagues' perceptions and experiences. Health Soc Care Community. 2019 Jul;27(4):e459-e470. doi: 10.1111/hsc.12746. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Clinical trials entries are delivered from the US National Institutes of Health and are not reviewed separately by this site. Please see the identifier information above for retrieving further details from the government database.

At TrialBulletin.com, we keep tabs on over 200,000 clinical trials in the US and abroad, using medical data supplied directly by the US National Institutes of Health. Please see the About and Contact page for details.