Cognitive Behavioural Therapy as an Effective Treatment for Social Anxiety, Perfectionism, and Rumination

Overview

This randomized, controlled trial study was designed to examine the efficacy of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) on social anxiety, perfectionism, and rumination among individuals diagnosed with social anxiety in Tehran, Iran.

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Treatment
    • Masking: Single (Participant)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: January 1, 2020

Detailed Description

A total of 52 individuals with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) (68% female, mean age = 35.67) were allocated to a CBT group or to a control group. The intervention group was given one session of therapy per week over a duration of 8 weeks, while the control group did not receive any intervention and was placed on a waiting list. Self-reported social anxiety, perfectionism, and rumination were measured before the CBT intervention, after the intervention, and two months after the intervention for both groups.

Interventions

  • Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy as an Effective Treatment for Social Anxiety, Perfectionism, and Rumination
    • Week one involved introducing CBT and assessing the negative effects of perfectionism, rumination, and social anxiety. Week two allowed participants to specify stressful social activities, stressful social situations, and enjoyable activities. Week three to week six allowed participants to identify automatic thoughts and thinking errors (for example, all or nothing thinking, self-criticism, dysfunctional schemas for self-evaluation, and unrealistic standards). Assignments were provided to participants with the content of exposure to anxiety evoking situations in the treatment sessions and at home. Achievable behavioural goals were set for participants in the treatment sessions and at home.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: Intervention study
    • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for social anxiety
  • Experimental: Social anxiety

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Change: Social anxiety
    • Time Frame: a measure assessing change between three time points (pre-test, post-test (after two months), and follow-up test (after four months)
    • Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale for measuring social anxiety. this scale comprises of fear or anxiety and avoidance and sub-scales are combine (summed) to compute total score. Total score ranging from 0 to 144, and An individual who gets a total score over 60 in this measure is considered to have social anxiety

Secondary Measures

  • Change: Rumination and Reflection
    • Time Frame: a measure assessing change between three time points (pre-test, post-test (after two months), and follow-up test (after four months))
    • Rumination and Reflection Questionnair for measuring rumination and reflection: This scale comprises rumination and reflection. Each sub-scale comprises 12 items, and total scores ranged from 12 to 60. An individual who gets higher score is considered to have high rumination/ reflection.

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • Participants formally diagnosed with SAD by psychologists who determined the individual meet criteria outlined by the Diagnostic and Statistics Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5)

Exclusion Criteria

  • If participants report a history of psychiatric disorders within the past 12 months such as schizophrenia, dementia, depression, alcohol and other drug addiction.
  • Participants could not partake if they were pregnant
  • Participants enroll in another psychological treatment program.

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: N/A

Maximum Age: N/A

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Alzahra University
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Abbas Abdollahi, Principal investigator – Alzahra University

Clinical trials entries are delivered from the US National Institutes of Health and are not reviewed separately by this site. Please see the identifier information above for retrieving further details from the government database.

At TrialBulletin.com, we keep tabs on over 200,000 clinical trials in the US and abroad, using medical data supplied directly by the US National Institutes of Health. Please see the About and Contact page for details.