Pgp Transporter and CNS Biodistribution of Ondansetron in Healthy Volunteers

Overview

To determine the time-course of plasma and CSF concentrations of intravenous (IV) ondansetron in healthy subjects, with and without selective inhibition of Pgp efflux transporter.

Full Title of Study: “Effects of Pgp Transporter Inhibition on CNS Biodistribution of Ondansetron in Healthy Volunteers”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Non-Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Other
    • Masking: Single (Participant)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: November 30, 2020

Detailed Description

The study hypothesis is that inhibition of Pgp efflux transporters will increase the CNS bio-distribution of the 5-HT3R antagonist ondansetron. Specifically: 1. Intravenous administration of ondansetron is expected to yield low CSF exposure. 2. Co-administration of ondansetron with intravenous tariquidar, an inhibitor of Pgp efflux transporters, will result in increased CSF exposure of ondansetron.

Interventions

  • Drug: Ondansetron 8mg with Saline & Tariquidar
    • Each participant will receive two IV infusions of ondansetron, 24 hours apart. In the first and second sessions, respectively, placebo (D5W) or tariquidar (4mg/kg dose in D5W) 22 will be administered IV over 60 minutes. Ondansetron will be diluted in 50mL 0.9% normal saline, and tariquidar will be diluted in 250mL D5W.
  • Drug: Ondansetron 16mg with Saline & Tariquidar
    • Each participant will receive two IV infusions of ondansetron, 24 hours apart. In the first and second sessions, respectively, placebo (D5W) or tariquidar (4mg/kg dose in D5W) 22 will be administered IV over 60 minutes. Ondansetron will be diluted in 50mL 0.9% normal saline, and tariquidar will be diluted in 250mL D5W.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: Ondansetron with Tariquidar
    • The participants will receive an IV ondansetron infusion with tariquidar. Participants will receive either 8mg or 16 mg of iv ondansetron, with 4mg/kg tariguidar.
  • Placebo Comparator: Ondansetron with Placebo
    • The participants will receive an IV ondansetron infusion with D5W as placebo. Participants will receive either 8mg or 16 mg of iv ondansetron.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • CSF penetration of ondansetron with and without tariquidar – area under the curve (AUC)
    • Time Frame: 48 hours
    • CSF penetration of intravenous ondansetron will be determined as AUCCSF0-∞ of ondansetron, and compared between the two sessions, with and without tariquidar

Secondary Measures

  • Cmax CSF
    • Time Frame: 48 hours
    • Maximum CSF concentration (Cmax CSF) of ondansetron, compared between the sessions
  • CSF:plasma concentration ratio
    • Time Frame: 48 hours
    • CSF:plasma concentration ratio of ondansetron, compared between the two sessions
  • Plasma Cmax
    • Time Frame: 48 hours
    • Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of ondansetron, compared between the sessions

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

1. Age 18-50; 2. Body mass index between 18.5 and 30; 3. Good general health with no remarkable medical conditions; 4. Able and willing to provide informed consent. Exclusion Criteria:

1. Current pregnancy or lactation; 2. Known history of hepatic, renal, or cardiac disease, including Long QT Syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias or QTc interval >450msec; 3. Known hypertension, endocrine disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), chronic pain, hematologic disorders, or psychiatric conditions requiring medications; 4. Abnormal vital signs at screening visit, including:

  • HR <40 or >100 – SBP < 90mmHg or >150mmHg – DBP > 100mmHg 5. Abnormal troponin values at screening visit 6. Abnormal complete blood count (CBC) or comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) values at screening visit that could affect drug pharmacokinetics, or suggest undiagnosed medical condition which would increase the risk of complications resulting from this study. 7. Any contraindication for ondansetron administration; 8. Peri- or post-menopausal women experiencing symptoms such as hot flashes; 9. Contraindication to intrathecal catheter placement, such as known coagulopathy or history of clotting disorders, history of scoliosis or lumbar fusion, current infection or fever; 10. Ongoing use of any of the following medications with known effects on Pgp function: carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital, cyclosporine, clarithromycin, erythromycin, ritonavir, verapamil, rifampicin, St. John's wort; 11. Current treatment (or treatment within < 5 half-lives) with any medication, including QT-prolonging drugs and drugs known to have a significant interaction with ondansetron or P-gp substrates (see below:) – Antiretrovirals of Protease inhibitor (e.g. Ritonavir, Saquinavir) or Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (e.g. Efavirenz, Zidovudine) family. – Phenytoin, Carbamazepine, Oxcarbazepine, Rifampin – Amiodarone – Azole antifungals (e.g. Itraconazole, Fluconazole) – Macrolide antibiotics (Erythromycin, Clarithromycin) – Cimetidine – Non-DHP calcium channel blockers Verapamil and Diltiazem – First generation antipsychotic medications Thioridazine, Haloperidol, Chlorpromazine, and Pimozide – Second generation antipsychotic medications Ziprasidone and Quetiapine – Antihistamine Terfenadine – Antidepressants Trazodone, Bupropion, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, Mirtazapine – Antiarrhythmics Propafenone, Flecainide, and Procainamide – Fluoroquinolone antibiotics Norfloxacin, Ofloxacin, and Ciprofloxacin – Cisapride – Fentanyl, Lithium, Tramadol – Intravenous Methylene blue – Other strong inhibitors or inducers of Cytochromes P450 2D6 or 3A4. – Other strong inhibitors or inducers of P-glycoprotein

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 18 Years

Maximum Age: 50 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Washington University School of Medicine
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: simon.haroutounian, Assistant Professor of Anesthsiology – Washington University School of Medicine
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Simon Haroutounian, PhD, Principal Investigator, Washington University School of Medicine

References

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Smith BH, Torrance N. Epidemiology of neuropathic pain and its impact on quality of life. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2012 Jun;16(3):191-8. doi: 10.1007/s11916-012-0256-0.

Finnerup NB, Attal N, Haroutounian S, McNicol E, Baron R, Dworkin RH, Gilron I, Haanpaa M, Hansson P, Jensen TS, Kamerman PR, Lund K, Moore A, Raja SN, Rice AS, Rowbotham M, Sena E, Siddall P, Smith BH, Wallace M. Pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Neurol. 2015 Feb;14(2):162-73. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(14)70251-0. Epub 2015 Jan 7.

Dogrul A, Ossipov MH, Porreca F. Differential mediation of descending pain facilitation and inhibition by spinal 5HT-3 and 5HT-7 receptors. Brain Res. 2009 Jul 14;1280:52-9. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2009.05.001. Epub 2009 May 8.

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