Effects of Progressive Elastic Band Resistance Training

Overview

Abnormal body composition with increased body fat mass and decreased lean body mass has been found in adults with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), contributing to reduced physical capacity and impairment. The aim of this study was to investigate whether progressive elastic band resistance training can improve physical motor performance and regional body composition in adults with PWS.

Full Title of Study: “Effects of Progressive Elastic Band Resistance Training on Body Composition and Motor Performance in Adults With Prader-Willi Syndrome: a Pilot Study”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Treatment
    • Masking: None (Open Label)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: December 31, 2016

Detailed Description

Six participants were enrolled in this pilot study. Following 24 weeks of progressive elastic band resistance exercise training, significant reduction was observed in their body weight, BMI, and regional extremities fat mass and percentage. Regarding the functional performances, there were also significant improvements in their hand grip strength, 3 meter timed up and go, 30 seconds sit to stand, and 2-min step up tests, as early as the 8th week of training. Balance function achieved significant improvements after 16 weeks of training.

Interventions

  • Device: PWS elastic band training group
    • PWS participants received 9 sets exercises for the major muscle groups, over 24 weeks, three times a week, for a total of 72 sessions.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: PWS elastic band training group
    • Genetically confirmed diagnosis of PWS participants were recruited. The PWS participants needed to have sufficient command of the Mandarin language to understand the study information and motivated to conduct the training program.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Changes in the handgrip strength functional physical assessment
    • Time Frame: Changes from Baseline functional motor performance tests at 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 24 weeks
    • hand grip strength (pounds),
  • Changes in the 30 second chair stand functional physical assessment
    • Time Frame: Changes from Baseline functional motor performance tests at 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 24 weeks
    • 30-second chair stand test (times)
  • Changes in the timed up and go functional physical assessment
    • Time Frame: Changes from Baseline functional motor performance tests at 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 24 weeks
    • timed up-and-go test (seconds)
  • Changes in the two minute step up functional physical assessment
    • Time Frame: Changes from Baseline functional motor performance tests at 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 24 weeks
    • 2 minute step up test (times)
  • Changes in the balance functional physical assessment
    • Time Frame: Changes from Baseline functional motor performance tests at 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 24 weeks
    • Berg Balance Scale (0-56 points; 0-20= high fall risk; 21-40= medium fall risk; 41-56= low fall risk)
  • Change in the BMI body composition
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline body composition components at 6 months
    • Body weight (km) and height (m) will be combined to report as BMI (kg/m2)
  • Change in the percentage of body fat of body composition
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline body composition components at 6 months
    • Regional percentage body fat (%)
  • Change in the body fat mass of body composition
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline body composition components at 6 months
    • Fat mass (kg)
  • Change in the lean body mass of body composition
    • Time Frame: Change from Baseline body composition components at 6 months
    • Lean body mass (kg)

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • PWS individuals who can cooperate with motor performances

Exclusion Criteria

  • arthritis, fracture, or severe musculoskeletal deformities that would interfere with exercise training or motor performance
  • severe cognitive impairment or parents who cannot read nor write.

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 18 Years

Maximum Age: 65 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: No

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Sponsor
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Valeria JY Chiu, MD, Principal Investigator, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation

Citations Reporting on Results

Schlumpf M, Eiholzer U, Gygax M, Schmid S, van der Sluis I, l'Allemand D. A daily comprehensive muscle training programme increases lean mass and spontaneous activity in children with Prader-Willi syndrome after 6 months. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Jan;19(1):65-74.

Eiholzer U, Nordmann Y, l'Allemand D, Schlumpf M, Schmid S, Kromeyer-Hauschild K. Improving body composition and physical activity in Prader-Willi Syndrome. J Pediatr. 2003 Jan;142(1):73-8.

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