Effect of Music on Stress and Delivery

Overview

The purpose of this study is to randomize women to be exposed during labor to different genres of music and study the effect of each genre on the level of objective and subjective stress as manifested by salivary cortisol and personal stress questionnaires, respectively. Secondary outcomes to be examined are obstetric and perinatal outcomes

Full Title of Study: “How do Different Genres of Music Played During Labor Effect the Stress Level and the Obstetric and Perinatal Results?”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
    • Masking: None (Open Label)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: December 2019

Detailed Description

For centuries, music has been known to have therapeutic effects on the body and the mind A large body of findings is related to the therapeutic potential of music in clinical settings, mainly among patients undergoing surgical and dental procedures, and also in other medical environments, such as intensive care, psychiatry, and geriatrics. Using music interventions in clinical settings was associated with reductions in negative effects in addition to objective stress and anxiety indices such as reduced heart rate, blood pressure, myocardial oxygen consumption, gastrointestinal function, anxiety, pain, and increased oxytocin levels.

One study found that women who listened to music before a cesarean section had a significant increase in positive emotions and a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure compared with a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure and respiratory rate in the control group. Li and Dong concluded in a different study, that preoperative music intervention can reduce anxiety and pain in women undergoing cesarean delivery.

Various studies examined the relation of music during labor to pain relief. One study found that the group of women going through music therapy had significantly lower pain, anxiety and a higher finger temperature during the latent phase of labor. One randomly assigned study found that women listened to soft music starting early in the active phase of labor had decreased sensation and distress of active labor pain. To date, no study examined the level of salivary cortisol while music is played at delivery room as an objective estimation of the stress level.

In addition to that, there is a lack of information regarding the effect of music during labor on the obstetric and perinatal outcomes.

Therefore, the purpose of this study is to randomize women to be exposed during labor to different genres of music and study the effect of each genre on the level of objective and subjective stress as manifested by salivary cortisol and personal stress questionnaire, respectively. Secondary outcomes to be examined are obstetric and perinatal outcomes.

Interventions

  • Behavioral: quiet music
    • playing quiet music during labor
  • Behavioral: Rhythmic music
    • playing rhythmic music during labor
  • Behavioral: control
    • No music during labor

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Placebo Comparator: control
    • No music during labor
  • Experimental: Quiet music
    • Women hearing quiet music during labor
  • Experimental: Rhythmic music
    • Women hearing rhythmic music during labor

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Objective stress
    • Time Frame: An hour after administration to delivery room
    • Stress as measured by saliva cortisol
  • Subjective stress
    • Time Frame: An hour after administration to delivery room
    • Stress as measured by questionnaires

Secondary Measures

  • Mode of delivery
    • Time Frame: through study completion, an average of 1 year
    • Cesarean delivery/ vaginal delivery/ operative delivery

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • age 18-45
  • single embryo
  • term labor, >=37 weeks of gestation

Exclusion Criteria

  • multiple embryos
  • Antepartum fetal death
  • preterm delivery

Gender Eligibility: Female

Minimum Age: 18 Years

Maximum Age: 45 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Meir Medical Center
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Yael Pasternak, Principal Investigator – Meir Medical Center

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