Lung and Gut Microbiome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Overview

Increasing evidence have implied that microbiota from airway and gut might be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the cross-talk between respiratory and gastrointestinal microbiome in COPD is still undetermined. The study is aimed to investigate the interaction between lung and gut flora, and their role in the process of COPD.

Full Title of Study: “The Relationship Between Lung and Gut Microbiome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Observational
  • Study Design
    • Time Perspective: Prospective
  • Study Primary Completion Date: February 15, 2016

Detailed Description

Despite the high prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there continues to be a large gap in our understanding of disease pathogenesis and mechanisms accounting for large variability in disease phenotype. Cigarette smoking is the principal cause of COPD, but only approximately 15% of adults with substantial tobacco exposure develop clinical COPD. Besides, bacterial colonization or infection is also considered as an important factor in COPD. There are very limited data from microbiome studies that suggest that respiratory and gastrointestinal microbiota may be involved in the pathogenesis of COPD. However, the cross-talk between between lung and gut microbiome, and their relationship with various clinical phenotypes of COPD. Here, we conducted 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing to evaluate the link between the lung-gut axis and the clinical phenotypes of COPD, such as lung function, emphysema, symptoms, exacerbations, inflammation levels and metabolic features.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • COPD
    • Smokers with clinically stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • healthy control
    • Age-matched subjects without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Microbiota that can predict the progress of lung function
    • Time Frame: 6 months
    • The study is aimed to investigate the relationship between the microbiota and the progress of lung function in COPD

Secondary Measures

  • Bacteria related to inflammatory factors
    • Time Frame: 6 months
    • The association between microbiota and inflammatory factors from host is also investigated
  • Bacteria related to metabolomics
    • Time Frame: 6 months
    • The association between microbiota and metabolites from host is also investigated

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

1. males aged 40-80;

2. diagnosed with COPD according to the GOLD guidelines;

3. clinically stable patients without medication changes or exacerbation in two months;

4. smoking history of more than 10 pack years

Exclusion Criteria

1. diagnosed with unstable cardiovascular diseases, significant renal or hepatic dysfunction or mental incompetence;

2. diagnosed with asthma, active pulmonary tuberculosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, cystic fibrosis, clinically significant bronchiectasis, exacerbation of COPD or pneumonia in two months;

3. prescribed immunosuppressive medications.

Gender Eligibility: Male

Minimum Age: 40 Years

Maximum Age: 80 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Peking University Third Hospital
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Bei He, Professor and Chief in Department of Respiratory Medicine – Peking University Third Hospital

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