The Effect of an Acute Bout of Exercise on High-sugar Meal Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

Overview

The purpose of this study is to determine if postprandial (after a meal) endothelial (inner lining of blood vessels) dysfunction induced by a high sugar meal improves with a bout of exercise

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Treatment
    • Masking: None (Open Label)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: December 2017

Detailed Description

Endothelial dysfunction is due to an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting substances produced by the endothelium. An imbalance in these substances limits the ability of the blood vessel to relax in response to a shear stress stimulus. Endothelial dysfunction is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High-sugar intakes result in postprandial hyperglycemia and endothelial dysfunction. Exercise may attenuate the endothelial dysfunction induced by a high-sugar meal. There are only two studies that have examined the effect of exercise on endothelial dysfunction induced by high-sugar intake. Both studies found that a bout of aerobic exercise attenuated the impaired flow mediated dilation induced by high-sugar ingestion. Neither study measured important markers of endothelial dysfunction such as blood nitric oxide, endothelin I, and angiotensin II concentrations, however. In addition, whether the same results apply to older post-menopausal women is unknown. Understanding how acute exercise affects meal-induced endothelial dysfunction in older women is important given that age is related to endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

Interventions

  • Other: Exercise Condition
    • A bout of exercise in the evening followed by high-sugar meal consumption the following morning
  • Other: Control Condition
    • Rest in the evening followed by high-sugar meal consumption the following morning

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: Exercise Condition
  • Active Comparator: Control Condition

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Change in brachial artery flow mediated dilation
    • Time Frame: 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes

Secondary Measures

  • Change in blood nitric oxide concentration
    • Time Frame: 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes
  • Change in blood endothelin-1concentration
    • Time Frame: 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes
  • Change in blood angiotensin II concentration
    • Time Frame: 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes
  • Change in blood glucose concentration
    • Time Frame: 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes
  • Change in blood insulin concentration
    • Time Frame: 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes
  • Change in blood lipoprotein particle numbers
    • Time Frame: 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes
  • Change in blood lipid concentration
    • Time Frame: 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • Post-menopausal women – Must be 45-70 years Exclusion Criteria:

  • Use of medications or supplements to lose weight – Following a weight loss diet – Smoking – Heavy alcohol consumption – Diabetes – Heart disease – Stroke – Liver disease – Kidney disease – Untreated thyroid disease – Anemia – Uncontrolled hypertension – Pulmonary disease that prevents exercise – Orthopedic problems that prevents exercise – Arthritis problems that prevent exercise – Musculoskeletal problems that prevent exercise.

Gender Eligibility: Female

Minimum Age: 45 Years

Maximum Age: 70 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Texas Christian University
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Meena Shah, Professor – Texas Christian University
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Meena Shah, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Tzu Chi University

References

Deanfield J, Donald A, Ferri C, Giannattasio C, Halcox J, Halligan S, Lerman A, Mancia G, Oliver JJ, Pessina AC, Rizzoni D, Rossi GP, Salvetti A, Schiffrin EL, Taddei S, Webb DJ; Working Group on Endothelin and Endothelial Factors of the European Society of Hypertension. Endothelial function and dysfunction. Part I: Methodological issues for assessment in the different vascular beds: a statement by the Working Group on Endothelin and Endothelial Factors of the European Society of Hypertension. J Hypertens. 2005 Jan;23(1):7-17. Review.

Widmer RJ, Lerman A. Endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Glob Cardiol Sci Pract. 2014 Oct 16;2014(3):291-308. doi: 10.5339/gcsp.2014.43. eCollection 2014. Review.

Loader J, Montero D, Lorenzen C, Watts R, M├ęziat C, Reboul C, Stewart S, Walther G. Acute Hyperglycemia Impairs Vascular Function in Healthy and Cardiometabolic Diseased Subjects: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2015 Sep;35(9):2060-72. doi: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.115.305530. Epub 2015 Jun 25. Review.

Zhu W, Zhong C, Yu Y, Li K. Acute effects of hyperglycaemia with and without exercise on endothelial function in healthy young men. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2007 Apr;99(6):585-91. Epub 2007 Jan 6.

Weiss EP, Arif H, Villareal DT, Marzetti E, Holloszy JO. Endothelial function after high-sugar-food ingestion improves with endurance exercise performed on the previous day. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jul;88(1):51-7.

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