Williams Syndrome (WS) and Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis (SVAS) DNA and Tissue Bank

Overview

Background: DNA tells the body how to grow and function. Williams-Beuren syndrome (WS) and Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis (SVAS) are rare diseases caused by changes in a part of a person s DNA. Symptoms of both conditions include vascular problems including narrow blood vessels and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) or supravalvular pulmonary stenosis. Individuals with WS may also have developmental challenges and personality differences. Researchers at the NIH want to find out why only some people with WS and SVAS have severe symptoms. They want to collect samples and data to see what DNA or environmental changes affect the severity of the disease. Objective: To identify the DNA differences or environmental changes that change the severity of WS and SVAS from person to person. Eligibility: People ages 0 85 with either WS, SVAS, and/or an SVAS-like condition Children and people with WS must have a parent or legal guardian to consent or help answer questions. Design: Participants will be screened with questions and medical history. Participants will have a 60-minute visit. They will provide blood or saliva samples. They or their parent/guardian will: Answer questions about how WS and SVAS affect them. Sign a form releasing their medical records for the study. If participant s regular doctor recommends surgery, researchers will ask the surgeon for skin or tissue samples that they might otherwise discard. These will be used to create stem cells to study in a lab. For up to 20 years, participants will have annual questionnaires by phone, email, or mail about their WS or SVAS. Participants may also be contacted if: They need to provide a new blood or saliva sample. Researchers need any other data. There is a follow-up study.

Study Type

  • Study Type: Observational
  • Study Design
    • Time Perspective: Prospective
  • Study Primary Completion Date: September 25, 2040

Detailed Description

Our goal with the Williams syndrome (WS) and Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis (SVAS), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and Tissue Bank is to collect enough samples from individuals with this rare condition to ask questions about the genes that cause the many WS and SVAS related phenotypes, and to determine the genetic and environmental changes that modify the severity of disease from person to person. In addition, we would like to learn more about the natural history of these conditions and if there are environmental or genetic signatures that are associated with symptom presence. The protocol detailed here will provide for the collection of historical information, laboratory and imaging data, DNA and tissue to perform these studies now and in the future. Because technology changes rapidly and because this is a rare condition, our goal is to generate a collection that will be available for analysis for many years. In addition to DNA and tissue collection proposed, we would like to begin to use the specimens collected here to continue to ask questions about modifiers of vascular disease severity as well as effects on other organ systems in WS and SVAS.

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • SVAS group
    • Children or adults must:be between the ages of 0-85;have clinical features of SVAS;SVAS- like condition; have genetic testing results that imply affected status (SVAS has decreased penetrance)
  • WS group
    • Children or adults must: be between the ages of 0 and 85 have a presumed or confirmed diagnosis of WS; and have a parent/guardian available to provide consent and assist in answering medical questions

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • The overall objective of this study is to collect historical information and to bank DNA, cells, and tissue from individuals with Williamssyndrome and SVAS to facilitate future research into the many phenotypes seen in these individuals.
    • Time Frame: ongoing
    • The overall objective of this study is to collect historical information and to bank DNA, cells, and tissue from individuals with WS and SVAS to facilitate future research into the many phenotypes seen in these individuals.

Secondary Measures

  • To identify genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the variability in different phenotypes in individuals with WS, SVAS, andSVAS-like conditions
    • Time Frame: ongoing
    • To identify genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the variability in different phenotypes (vascular and non-vascular) in individuals with WS, SVAS and SVAS-like conditions. For the non-vascular features of WS and SVAS-like conditions for which a specific gene has not been implicated in the disease, we would also like to identify causative genes.

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • We will recruit individuals with WS, SVAS, or SVAS-like conditions. – Children or adults participating in this study as part of the WS group must: – be between the ages of 0 and 85 – have a presumed or confirmed diagnosis of WS – have a parent/guardian available to provide consent and assist in answering medical questions – Children or adults participating in the study as part of the SVAS group must: – be between the ages of 0 and 85 – have clinical features suggestive of SVAS or an SVAS-like condition OR have no clinical features of SVAS or an SVAS-like condition but have genetic testing results that imply affected status (SVAS has decreased penetrance). – have a parent/guardian available to provide consent and assist in answering medical questions if they are a minor (not applicable to adults)
  • Gender Eligibility: All

    Minimum Age: N/A

    Maximum Age: 85 Years

    Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: No

    Investigator Details

    • Lead Sponsor
      • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
    • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
      • Sponsor
    • Overall Official(s)
      • Beth A Kozel, M.D., Principal Investigator, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
    • Overall Contact(s)
      • Sharon Osgood, R.N., (301) 827-3237, sharon.osgood@nih.gov

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