Relaxation Training for People With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Overview

People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) suffer from dyspnoea, which may be exacerbated by psychological outcomes including anxiety and depression. Previous studies suggest that relaxation techniques may have positive effects on pulmonary rehabilitation. The main aim of this study is to explore both the respiratory and psychological impact of a quick, one-session, relaxation training for people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

Full Title of Study: “A Quick Relaxation Training for People With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Treatment
    • Masking: Single (Participant)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: March 2016

Interventions

  • Behavioral: Guided Relaxation Technique
  • Other: Documentary Movie

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: Guided Relaxation Technique
    • Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in the First Second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC, Heart Rate Variability (HRV), airway resistance (kPa/l/s), before and after an 11 minutes, one-session, guided relaxation technique Following 30-40 minutes questionnaire, 5 minutes heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) recording, 11 minutes relaxation technique (listening via headphone to audio recording. In the meanwhile, heart rate and saturation are recording) to be completed by second heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) recording. Entire procedure 60-80 minutes.
  • Sham Comparator: Documentary movie
    • Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in the First Second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC, Heart Rate Variability (HRV), airway resistance (kPa/l/s), before and after an 11 minutes documentary movie. Following 30-40 minutes questionnaire, 5 minutes heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) recording, 11 minutes documentary movie (listening via headphone. In the meanwhile, heart rate and saturation are recording) to be completed by second heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) recording. Entire procedure 60-80 minutes.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Differences in patients’ state of dyspnea, before and after the treatment, as assessed by the Borg Scale (BORG)
    • Time Frame: Baseline and following filling in all the psychological tests and the session of relaxation technique/documentary movie (60-80 minutes elapsed time)

Secondary Measures

  • Changes in Heart Rate Variability (HRV), before, during and after the treatment
    • Time Frame: It is recorded for 5 minutes before, during and after the session of relaxation technique/documentary movie (60-80 minutes elapsed time)
  • Changes in oxygen saturation (SpO2), before, during and after the treatment
    • Time Frame: It is recorded for 5 minutes before, during and after the session of relaxation technique/documentary movie (60-80 minutes elapsed time)
  • Changes in airway resistance (kPa/l/s) before and after the treatment
    • Time Frame: Baseline and following filling in all the psychological tests and the session of relaxation technique/documentary movie (60-80 minutes elapsed time)
  • Changes in subjective feelings of anxiety, before and after the treatment, as measured by the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y1)
    • Time Frame: Before the session of relaxation training/documentary movie and after it (60-80 minutes elapsed time)
  • Changes in the intensity of subjective feelings, before and after the treatment, as assessed by a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)
    • Time Frame: Before the session of relaxation training/documentary movie and after it (60-80 minutes elapsed time)
  • Changes in the intensity of positive and negative affects, before and after the treatment, as assessed by the Positive and Negative Affective Schedule (PANAS)
    • Time Frame: Before the session of relaxation training/documentary movie and after it (60-80 minutes elapsed time)
  • Presence and intensity of the possible subjective experience of engaging just-manageable challenges by tackling a series of goals, continuously processing feedback about progress, and adjusting action based on this feedback, after the treatment
    • Time Frame: After the session of relaxation training/documentary movie (60-80 minutes after the baseline)
    • Presence and intensity of the possible state of flow experience, as assessed by a short form of the Flow State Scale, called Short Flow State Scale -2 (FSS-2)
  • Differences in Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), before and after the treatment
    • Time Frame: Baseline and following filling in all the psychological tests and the session of relaxation technique/documentary movie (60-80 minutes elapsed time)
  • Differences in Forced Expiratory Volume in The First Second (FEV1), before and after the treatment
    • Time Frame: Baseline and following filling in all the psychological tests and the session of relaxation technique/documentary movie (60-80 minutes elapsed time)

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • Written Informed Consent;
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) diagnosis confirmed by a specialized physician;
  • basal FEV1/FVC <70%, using the standards established by Global Initiative For Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD);
  • Modified British Medical Research Council Questionnaire (mMRC) ≥ 2;
  • COPD Assessment Test (CAT) ≥ 10.

Exclusion Criteria

  • Pregnancy;
  • psychiatric disturbances;
  • oncological diseases;
  • comorbid states that determine an immunosuppressive condition.

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 18 Years

Maximum Age: N/A

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: No

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi Onlus
  • Collaborator
    • Catholic University of the Sacred Heart
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Sponsor

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