How Well do Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury Learn New Material Using Learning Styles in Online Science Classrooms?

Overview

The purpose of this study is to determine whether learning styles are effective in the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in an educational environment.

Full Title of Study: “Instructional Design Strategies to Support Adult Patients/Students (Civilian & Military) With Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Basic Science
    • Masking: Single (Participant)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: February 2013

Detailed Description

The purpose of this study is to determine the learning outcome and effectiveness of instructional design strategy using Canfield's learning styles and Gardner's Multiple Intelligences to accommodate TBI-induced cognitive impairments in an online science learning environment.

Interventions

  • Behavioral: CLSI, MI, CR
    • (CLSI) Canfield Learning Styles Inventory (MI) Multiple Intelligences (CR) Cognitive Rehabilitation
  • Behavioral: CLSI – Unknown
    • (CLSI) Canfield Learning Styles Inventory (MI) Multiple Intelligences (CR) Cognitive Rehabilitation

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: CLSI – Known
    • Participants will be assigned to a specific learning group via the Canfield Learning Style Inventory (CLSI).
  • Active Comparator: CLSI – Unknown
    • Participants will be assigned to a traditional learning group (Control).

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Learning Effectiveness
    • Time Frame: 3 Months
    • This study will explore the use of a cognitive rehabilitation approach as suggested by Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences for its potential application to online course design for brain injured patients/students. It involves designing instruction for a science unit based on four of Canfield’s learning styles.

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

1. People who have been diagnosed with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). 2. People who are able to understand and sign an informed consent form. 3. People who have no other known neurological disorder (e.g. aphasia, stroke). 4. All participants must be 18-50 years old. 5. Be able to speak and understand English, and 6. Have use of a computer (Mac or Windows) and internet (www) access. Exclusion Criteria:

1. Don't meet the inclusion Criteria 2. Other known neurological disorder (e.g. aphasia, stroke).

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 18 Years

Maximum Age: 50 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: No

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • Center for Vision Development, New Market, Maryland
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Principal Investigator: Mark Pettinato, Principal Investigator – Center for Vision Development, New Market, Maryland
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Mark C. Pettinato, M.S., Principal Investigator, Capella University

References

Canfield, A. (1980). Learning styles inventory manual. Ann Arbor, MI: Humanics Media. Pashler, H.; McDaniel, M.; Rohrer, D.; Bjork, R. (2009).

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