The Effects of Exercise Versus Inactivity on People With Mitochondrial Muscle Disease

Overview

Mitochondrial myopathies include various inherited diseases that are caused by damage to the mitochondria, energy-producing structures that fuel the body's processes. The main symptoms are muscle weakness, reduced muscle mass, and difficulty with exercising. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of exercise training versus inactivity on mitochondrial function in muscle and muscle performance in people with mitochondrial myopathies.

Full Title of Study: “Exercise Training and Deconditions: Implications for Therapy in Mitochondrial Myopathy”

Study Type

  • Study Type: Interventional
  • Study Design
    • Allocation: Randomized
    • Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
    • Primary Purpose: Treatment
    • Masking: None (Open Label)
  • Study Primary Completion Date: June 2012

Detailed Description

Mitochondrial myopathies are caused by mutant mitochondrial DNA, genetic defects in parts of the mitochondrial DNA. These defects can include missing or deleted DNA that typically codes for certain proteins involved in energy production. These mutations cause individual mitochondria and the body on a whole to produce energy less efficiently. Because muscle cells require extensive energy to function properly, they are particularly impaired by mitochondrial dysfunction. The onset of most mitochondrial myopathies occurs before the age of 20. Initially a person may experience muscle weakness and fatigue during physical activity. Other symptoms may include limited eye mobility, heart arrhythmias, slurred speech, swallowing difficulties, and impaired movement.

There is no cure yet for mitochondrial myopathies, nor is there any adequate treatment to stall disease progression. Exercise, known to boost the production and function of mitochondria in healthy people, may reduce symptoms in people with mitochondrial myopathies by increasing the number and function of normal mitochondria in an individual muscle cell. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of exercise training versus inactivity on the expression of normal and mutant mitochondrial DNA and on mitochondrial production within muscle cells in people with mitochondrial myopathies. The study will also assess how cell function, physical endurance, heart function, and quality of life are affected by exercise training and inactivity.

Participants in this 2-year study will first undergo physiological exercise testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of heart and skeletal muscles, a needle biopsy of muscle, and a questionnaire on quality of life. Participants will then be randomly assigned to partake in regular exercise training or no training for 6 months. After 6 months, all participants will undergo repeat testing of initial evaluations. Participants who had been in the exercising group will then switch to no exercise training for 6 months, and participants who had been in the non-exercising group will switch to regular exercise training for 6 months. The second 6-month period will also be followed by repeat testing of initial evaluations. Participants will then be encouraged to continue exercise training for an additional 1 year, with retesting at the end of the second year. Each of the four evaluations will take about 15 hours over 5 days.

Interventions

  • Behavioral: Exercise
    • Regular exercise training

Arms, Groups and Cohorts

  • Experimental: 1
    • Participants will partake in regular exercise training for 6 months. After 6 months, they will switch to no exercise training for 6 months. Participants will then be encouraged to continue exercise training for an additional 1 year.
  • Experimental: 2
    • Participants will not partake in regular exercise training for 6 months. After 6 months, they will switch to exercise training for 6 months. Participants will then be encouraged to continue exercise training for an additional 1 year.

Clinical Trial Outcome Measures

Primary Measures

  • Changes in wild-type (normal), mutant, and total mitochondrial DNA copy number
    • Time Frame: Measured at Week 26
  • Physiological measure of oxidative metabolism
    • Time Frame: Measured at Week 26

Participating in This Clinical Trial

Inclusion Criteria

  • Diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy
  • Single-large scale deletions of mitochondrial DNA
  • Point mutations in mitochondrial DNA

Exclusion Criteria

  • Symptoms or electrocardiogram-generated signs of coronary artery disease
  • Symptoms of congestive heart failure; peripheral vascular disease; or lung, kidney, or liver disease
  • History of alcohol or substance abuse
  • Metal implants or related devices that contraindicate MRI
  • Current use of or require any medications that have significant systemic cardiovascular effects
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity (body mass index [BMI] greater than 30)
  • Resting systolic blood pressure greater than 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure greater than 90 mmHg at three different times

Gender Eligibility: All

Minimum Age: 18 Years

Maximum Age: 65 Years

Are Healthy Volunteers Accepted: No

Investigator Details

  • Lead Sponsor
    • National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
  • Provider of Information About this Clinical Study
    • Ronald Haller, Universit y of Texas Southwestern Medical School
  • Overall Official(s)
    • Ronald Haller, MD, Principal Investigator, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
  • Overall Contact(s)
    • Ronald Haller, MD, 214-345-4621, rhaller2@earthlink.net

Clinical trials entries are delivered from the US National Institutes of Health and are not reviewed separately by this site. Please see the identifier information above for retrieving further details from the government database.

At TrialBulletin.com, we keep tabs on over 200,000 clinical trials in the US and abroad, using medical data supplied directly by the US National Institutes of Health. Please see the About and Contact page for details.